Foot & Ankle Surgery

Ankle Arthroscopy

Arthroscopy is a surgical procedure during which the internal structure of a joint is examined for diagnosis and treatment of problems inside the joint. Ankle Arthroscopy includes the diagnosis and treatment of ankle conditions. In arthroscopic examination, a small incision is made in the patient’s skin through which pencil-sized instruments that have a small lens and lighting system (arthroscope) are passed. Arthroscope magnifies and illuminates the structures of the joint with the light that is transmitted through fiber optics. It is attached to a television camera and the interior of the joint is seen on the television monitor.

Arthroscopic examination of ankle joint is helpful in diagnosis and treatment of the following conditions:

  • Inflammation: Synovitis, the inflammation of the lining of the ankle joint
  • Acute or chronic injury
  • Osteoarthritis: A type of arthritis caused by cartilage loss in a joint

During arthroscopic ankle surgery, either a general or local anesthesia will be given depending on the condition. A small incision of the size of a buttonhole is made through which the arthroscope is inserted. Other accessory incisions will be made through which specially designed instruments are inserted. After the procedure is completed arthroscope is removed and incisions are closed. You may be instructed about the incision care, activities to be avoided and exercises to be performed for faster recovery.

Some of the conditions treated by ankle arthroscopy include:

  • Ankle Arthritis
  • Unstable ankle
  • Ankle fracture
  • Osteochondral Defects of the talus
  • Infection
  • Undiagnosed ankle pain

Some of the possible complications after arthroscopy include infection, phlebitis (clotting of blood in vein), excessive swelling, bleeding, blood vessel or nerve damage and instrument breakage.

Recovery

It may take several weeks for the puncture wounds to heal and the joint to recover completely. A rehabilitation program may be advised for a speedy recovery of normal joint function. Your child can resume normal activities and go back to school within a few days.

Bunion Surgery

Bunion is a foot deformity that changes the shape of the foot causing the big toe to turn inward, towards the second toe leading to pain and inflammation. A bunion is caused by incorrect footwear, joint damage, arthritis, and genetic disposition. Some of the commonly observed symptoms are pain, inflammation, bony bump on the side of the foot.

Bunion may be corrected with conservative treatment or surgery. If the conservative treatment does not treat the bunion pain, then your surgeon may recommend bunionectomy, surgical removal of a bunion. The main goal of the surgery is to remove painful deformities, restore normal bone alignment, and prevent recurrence.

This surgery involves shaving the inflamed tissue around the big toe joint using a shaving drill. A part of the bone in big toe is cut to straighten the toe (osteotomy). Ligaments are tightened and adjusted in a proper direction. Screws and pins are used to fuse the bones together. After the surgery, your surgeon may instruct you to wear crutches to prevent weight bearing. Some of the complications of the surgery include infection, stiffness of the toe, loss of blood supply to the toe, and over-correction. Over-correction leads to turning of the big toe outward (Hallux varus). However, these complications can be corrected.

valley Health SystemsMSJNJoseph Healthcare